Article in Politics / Taxation
The Henry Report implicitly maintains the myth that wealth is the product of past labour income combined with a propensity for saving, and such propensity should receive its just reward. It advocates that most capital incomes continue to be lightly taxed.
 
 
There are currently no saved images.
There are currently no saved videos.
There is currently no saved audio.
There are currently no saved documents.

BestThinking.com to Shut Down Permanently on December 31, 2017

If you want to save a copy of your content, you must do so before the website shuts down on December 31, 2017. We will NOT be able to provide any assistance after the website shuts down. We are available at support@thinkermedia.com only until the shutdown to provide more information and assistance.

It was a noble 10-year experiment, but it turns out that the writers with the best content are the least adept at the tech required to publish under our model, which in hindsight, makes perfect sense. If you are dedicating your life to becoming an expert in your specialty, you don’t have a lot of time left for figuring out publishing tech.

It hasn't helped that we have entered an age of unprecedented polarization and antagonism which doesn't foster demand for a website dedicated to the respectful engagement of diverse views.

Thank you, everyone!

Close
David Ingles Identity Verified

About the Author 

David Ingles
Dr David Ingles received his PhD in public policy from the Australian National University in 2001. He has a Masters degree in economics fro

Recent Content by David Ingles

The Henry Tax Report and Capital Income Taxation

The Henry Report implicitly maintains the myth that wealth is the product of past labour income combined with a propensity for saving, and such propensity should receive its just reward. It advocates that most capital incomes continue to be lightly taxed.

 
Latest Thinking in Politics & Government
corner
corner
 
 
Latest Ebooks