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Gloria Feldt
Gloria Feldt
Gloria Feldt is a leading women's activist, keynote speaker, and best selling author most recently of No Excuses: 9 Ways Women Can Change How We Think About Power. She teaches Women, Power, and Leadership at Arizona State University and is former president, Planned Parenthood Federation of America.
 

Hilary Rosen v Ann Romney: Will Mitt Benefit?

Apr. 12, 2012 3:04 pm
Keywords: None
Resisting the cheap thrill of calling this the "War Between Women," I nevertheless think this dustup pitting two views of modern womanhood against one another is worth acknowledging. Do you think Rosen was right in what she said?

Politico Arena asks:

During an appearance on CNN Wednesday night, Democratic commentator Hilary Rosen questioned whether Ann Romney was qualified to be talking about women’s economic issues since she’s “never worked a day in her life.”

On Twitter @AnnDRomney responded: "I made a choice to stay home and raise five boys. Believe me, it was hard work."

Do Rosen's comments advance the Democratic narrative of a GOP "war on women"?

Or is it a mean-spirted attack on Mitt Romney's wife of 42 years that's like to backfire on the Obama campaign and fellow Democrats? http://politi.co/HBRdyo

My Response:

Rosen's words about Ann Romney were ill-chosen, unkind, and aggravate a festering boil even among women in the paid workplace who are struggling to balance work and family responsibilities. It's not as though stay-at-home moms have no brains with which to consider economic issues.

That said, Rosen's concerns about Ann Romney would have rung both accurate and true had she stated them differently. Romney had the luxury to stay home with her boys because of her privileged position as the wife of a man who has been wealthy all his life. For most women, paid employment isn't a choice, it's an economic necessity. But that's not the only reason women work. It's fulfilling to use one's gifts to contribute to society both within and outside of the home. And it's fulfilling to earn a paycheck—a fair paycheck.

With Equal Pay Day—the date in April when women across America are reminded of the 23% pay gap between them and men doing the same work—looming, Mitt Romney's wildly inaccurate allegations about Obama causing women's job losses, and his party's 18% gender gap in key swing states because of their War on Women's bodies and economic lives, the Republican standard bearer has a lot more to worry about than what Hilary Rosen is saying about his wife.

For the same reasons that her husband comes across as a man out-of-touch with working families since he grew up and remains wealthy beyond most people's wildest expectations, Ann Romney—who undoubtedly had far more household help raising those five boys than most Americans can even imagine—can't hide behind the "it took a lot of work" excuse to justify relinquishing whatever career aspirations she might have had as a young woman. She was able to maintain her no-longer-traditional role of wife as helpmeet in charge of child rearing only because she married a 1%'er.

 
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